Team Crime Story:This week at Crime Story we continued our presentation of the series by Katherine Mader and we featured an interview about the the upcoming Impeachment trial with a scholar who happens to be my brother.

Welcome to our summary of the week’s events at CrimeStory.com and The Crime Story Podcast.


Yesterday, we presented my interview with William Antholis entitled “High Crimes Story 2” — The Second Impeachment of Donald Trump.

Bill serves as director and CEO of the Miller Center, a nonpartisan affiliate of the University of Virginia that specializes in presidential scholarship, public policy, and political history. Immediately prior, he served as managing director at The Brookings Institution for 10 years. He also is the author of the book Inside Out India and China: Local Politics Go Global which explores how country-sized provinces and states in the world’s two biggest nations are increasingly becoming global players.

In addition to all of that, Bill is my younger brother and — with the House of Representatives scheduled to deliver the article of Impeachment to the Senate on Monday — Bill joins me to discuss the upcoming second impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump. This interview was conducted last Sunday, January 17.

On Wednesday and Thursday, we continued our new Crime Story series excerpting Inside the Robe: A Judge’s Candid Tale of Criminal Justice in America, by Judge Katherine Mader (Ret.) which best selling author Michael Connelly called: “a perfect book: engrossing and telling at the same time.”

In Part 13 of Inside the Robe, Judge Mader explores the power dynamics between prosecutors and compassionate judges.

In Part 14 Judge Mader examines how hard it is to ascertain the true narrative of events behind a criminal trial, as well as her gratitude for the moments when she can help uncover hidden truths that serve to liberate wrongfully convicted individuals.


Below we present Hannah Teich’s condensed curation of the week’s more interesting stories from Crime Story Daily. (Read Hannah’s full essay including links to the mentioned articles.)

On the criminal justice policy front: A piece from Politico outlines several possible paths of action in the fight against domestic terrorism. Pieces from The Intercept, the Wall Street Journal, and Lawfare follow the investigation into the January 6 assault on the US Capitol. WBEZ and The Appeal report from Illinois, where, earlier this week, state lawmakers passed a sweeping omnibus criminal justice reform bill in the waning hours of their lame-duck session.

In muckraker/watchdog reporting: Pieces from The Marshall Project and NBC center on the ongoing coronavirus crisis in America’s prisons and jails. Pieces from The Nation, The Guardian, and Slate focus on the fallout from the Capitol insurrection, highlighting the role of police bias and the long history of alliances between far-right vigilantism and law enforcement.

In complex crime storytelling: A piece from The Atlantic goes deep into the ridiculous and terrifying world of “boogaloo bois.” Wired explores the sprawling “tactical shooting” industry teaching American civilians how to fight like Special Ops. And a piece from GQ follows UN war crimes detectives on the hunt for Félicien Kabuga, “one of the world’s most wanted men.”

In culture/true crime: The Atlantic highlights “MLK/FBI,” a new documentary about the Bureau’s campaign to spy on Martin Luther King. A piece from the Hollywood Reporter puts Garrett Bradley, director of the Sundance-winning documentary “Time,” in conversation with Tommy Oliver, the filmmaker behind HBO’s “40 Years a Prisoner.” And the University of Denver’s Prison Arts Initiative presents A/LIVE INSIDE, a “virtual showcase of artists and their stories from Colorado’s prisons.”

Again, you can read Hannah’s full weekly essay and find links to each of the mentioned articles.

And finally, here is your opportunity to catch up on previous Crime Story Newsletters.

Thanks again for reading and listening.

Kary Antholis

Publisher/Editor, Crime Story

[email protected]