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CalGang

According to the California Department of Justice, you are eligible for inclusion on CalGang, a statewide database of gang members and gang associates,...

A Convicted Fireman/Arsonist and Me: The Facts As I Knew Them

This the second part of a series of articles about my relationship with John Orr. You can find part one of the series here.

Crime Story Scoop: Robert Durst Admits “Killed Them All” Recording is “True and Accurate”

Robert Durst has - for the first time - acknowledged that certain audio recordings made by the producers of the HBO documentary series...

Robert Durst: You Can’t Unring the Bell

For a judge, maintaining courtroom control over unruly attorneys can be a daily challenge. According to one retired jurist, some judges have a...

Paul Butler Reads: The Promise and Failure of “Queen & Slim”

Black protest – especially against police violence – scares some people. The Attorney General of the United States, for example, does not think the police should be criticized.  Last week William Barr issued a  threat:  if certain communities don’t start showing the police “support and respect” they “might find themselves without the police protection they need.”   In an earlier speech to the Fraternal Order of Police, Barr claimed “the anti-police narrative is fanning disrespect for...

PART 3 — PODCAST SPECIAL: The First Los Angeles District Attorney Debate

This is the third part of a three part look at the First Los Angeles District Attorney Debate of the 2020 election cycle. You can find part 1 of this series here and part 2 of the series here. On December 19, 2019 USC Law Professor Jody Armour moderated the first Los Angeles DA debate in which candidates George Gascón and Rachel Rossi squared off over a host of criminal justice issues. Conspicuously missing from the event was incumbent Jackie Lacey, who cited a scheduling conflict. In today’s Podcast Special, we examine the responses of George Gascón and Rachel Rossi to questions about police accountability, the death penalty and homelessness. The fourth speaker of the night was Helen Jones who was tasked with asking a question about police accountability. When Helen took the mic, her words were a visceral force, blazing in determination but soaking in grief. JONES: MY NAME IS HELEN JONES AND MY SON JOHN HORTON WAS BEAT TO DEATH IN 2009 IN MEN’S CENTRAL JAIL. HE WAS BEAT TO DEATH IN SOLITARY CONFINEMENT. THEY BUST HIS LIVER,...