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Anatomy of Doubt (Martinez 2)

Jim Moss’s job is to save lives. A 29-year veteran of the LA County Sheriff’s Department, Moss has spent 14 of those years serving as a rescue paramedic...

A Chair and a Killing

Think about the least significant piece of furniture in your home: a stool, a hamper, maybe a couch pillow. For me, it’s a cheap Ikea chair, one...

Strong Female Lead (Moorer 1) with Molly Miller Reading

It’s almost like a gritty, high-octane action flick. The female lead is a young prostitute and this is the climax of her narrative...

Wait, What?: A Closing Statement

As I walk into Department 109 of the Criminal Courts Building, I hear the following words and my ears prick up: IT WASN'T...

First Days: Tragedy and Transformation in Juvenile Justice

We watch the video footage. These are the moments leading up to the discovery of the boy’s suicide. The grainy, black-and-white images show a staff member looking in the boy’s cell, calling for help, opening the cell door, and, with the assistance of some other residents, pulling the boy's limp body out onto the floor of the dayroom.  After watching the video, members of the Attorney General’s office and my staff jump into a...

Talk Foreal (Excarceration 1)

On Saturday, June 1, 2019, Defy Ventures held an event called Business Coaching Day at the NationBuilder offices in downtown Los Angeles. As a nonprofit focused on reducing recidivism by supporting currently and formerly incarcerated men to become entrepreneurs, Defy puts on Business Coaching Days to give their participants, known as “Entrepreneurs-in-Training” (or EITs), an opportunity to learn from and be mentored by local executives. But their June event was unique: It was the first Business Coaching Day held outside prison and therefore primarily aimed to help EITs in transitional housing. There were roughly 10 EITs and about as many mentors, so that all coaching rounds were staged as one-on-one meetings. In between the coaching rounds were more personal exercises and icebreakers. Three Crime Story writers — Shawn Boursiquot, Leland Hall, and Wesley Yiin — attended this event. These are Shawn’s reflections. It feels similar to the first day of school, the open space packed with strangers who despite my social awkwardness I know I’ll be forced to talk to. The EITs and volunteers take their seats around the room, pairing up for our first exercise. I...